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UPDATE M A Weekly - Bulletin June 22nd 2024 - Beha'alotcha - 16 SIVAN 5784

06/21/2024 01:36:43 PM

Jun21

M.A. WEEKLY

                      

 

CLIQUEZ ICI Pour voir ce communiqué en Français (Traduction automatique par Google)

 

 

SCHEDULE

SHABBAT TIMES

 

 

Friday Night, @Maghen Abraham

 

Mincha 6:30pm followed by Shir Hashirim -Kabbalat Shabbat - Arvit

 

Shabbat Candle lighting  8:26 pm

 

Saturday, @Maghen Abraham  

 

Shahrit 9am

 

Perasha -  Beha'alotcha

Haftara - Zachariah 2:14 - 4:7

 

Kiddush Sponsored by

Mayer & Murielle Sasson in Honor of the birth of their 1st Grand Daughter

Ellie Margo to Parents Josh Mosseri and Daniella Sasson

Joe Benamor in Honor of the birth of his Grand son Jordan Ezra SON OF  LAUREN SARA AND JERRY PARELLA

 

Mincha 8:10PM followed by Arvit 

 

Havdalah:  9:45pm

 

UPCOMING THIS WEEK

CELEBRATIONS

MABROOK!!!

Josh Mosseri and Daniella Sasson

On the birth of a BABY GIRL! 

 

ELLIE MARGO 


May she bring you joy and Happiness

Proud Grandparents, 
Mayer and Murielle Sasson
Rick and Carla Mosseri,
Proud Great-Grandparents
Selim & Andree Sasson
Leon & Vivianne Mosseri

Yaffa Benisti

 

MABROOK!!!

CONGRATULATIONS TO JOE BENAMOR ON THE BIRTH OF A NEW GRANDSON:

Jordan Ezra

SON OF  LAUREN SARA AND JERRY PARELLA.

 

PROUD GRANDPARENTS JOE BENAMOR AND ROSELINE UNGER

 

MABROOK!!!

Ronnie Sayegh

on her birthday

 

MABROOK!!!

Albert Sayegh & Samara Sayegh

on their wedding anniversary

 

MABROOK!!!

Benjamin (Rabih) Fraenkel

on his birthday

 

MABROOK!!!

Ben Battat

on his birthday

 

HAZKAROT

 

 

 

NOTICES

THE COMMUNITY OFFERS IT'S CONDOLENCES TO THE ROMANO FAMILY ON THE PASSING OF
SOLLY ROMANO Z'L
___________________________________________________
The COMMUNITY OFFERS IT's CONDOLENCES to the TOTAH FAMILY ON THE PASSING OF ABraham BOCHI z'L
___________________________________________________
REFUA SHELEMA TO MoUSSA SAAD
___________________________________________________
refua shelema to AHOUVA BAT MAZAL
___________________________________________________

REFUA SHELEMA TO Shlomo Ben Linda

NEWSLETTER

Bonjour / Hello [nickname_else_first_name],

Table of contents

 

1) Perashat Hashavoua - Rabbi Eli Mansour

2) Halakhat Hashavoua (Halakhot related to day to day life) By Hazzan David Azerad  -

Personal Requests in the Amida - Peninei Halacha

3) Holy Jokes!

4) For KIDS

 

 

 This Week's Parasha Insight with Rabbi Eli Mansour

Parashat Beha’alotecha- Teaching and Growing

We read in Parashat Beha’alotecha of a conversation between Moshe Rabbenu and his father-in-law, Yitro (who is called here by one of his other names, Hobab), before Beneh Yisrael’s journey from Mount Sinai. Moshe asked Yitro to join the nation along their trip to the Land of Israel, but Yitro declined, replying, "I shall not go; rather, I shall go to my land and my birthplace" (10:30). Moshe then insisted, "Do not leave us, for you know our encampments in the desert, and you can serve as our guide. And when you come with us, that goodness which G-d will bestow upon us – we will bestow upon you."

Why did Yitro not want to join Beneh Yisrael? And what exactly was Moshe’s response?

To explain this conversation, let us examine a verse in the Haftara for this Parasha – a prophecy from the Book of Zecharya (2-3). The prophet Zecharya is shown a vision of the Kohen Gadol at that time – Yehoshua – standing before an angel. The angel assured Yehoshua, in G-d’s Name, that if he obeys G-d’s commands, then "Ve’natati Lecha Mahlchim Ben Ha’omedim Ha’eleh" – "I shall allow you to walk among these who stand" (3:7). This means that he would be granted the privilege of being in the company of the angels.

The Rabbis found it very significant that the prophet here refers to Yehoshua as "walking" ("Mahlchim") while the angels are described as "standing" ("Omedim"). Human beings have the unique ability to "walk" – to progress and advance. This is in contrast to angels, who remain the same throughout the time they exist. They remain the beings that they are, without ever changing. We human beings, however, are able to grow and change, to become better.

The Sages teach in the Gemara that one should learn only from a Rabbi who "resembles an angel." This has been understood to mean that a worthy teacher is one who is willing to compromise his own personal growth for the sake of teaching. A Rabbi is expected to be an "angel" in the sense of putting his own growth on hold in order to spend time working with students who know far less than he does, and who are on a far lower spiritual level than he is. He must, to a degree, resemble an "angel," which "stands" in place and cannot grow, because otherwise he will not be able to put in the time and effort to help his students realize their potential.

However, while a Rabbi must be willing to resemble an "angel" in this fashion, in truth, he will never end up actually sacrificing his own growth for the sake of teaching – for two reasons.

First, a Rabbi has the ability to motivate and inspire even without actually teaching. His very presence, and the example he sets, has a profound impact on his surroundings. And so in a way, a Rabbi has the ability to "teach" without actually teaching, and thus he does not need to compromise his own religious and intellectual growth.

But additionally, students help a teacher grow by asking questions and expecting answers. As Rabbi Yehuda Ha’nasi said, "From my students more than them all" – he learned more from his students then he did from his teachers and his colleagues. A Rabbi must be prepared to sacrifice his own advancement for his students, but this sacrifice in truth is not necessary, because a Rabbi grows through teaching inquisitive students who are eager to learn and to understand.

Yitro told Moshe, "Lo Elech" – "I shall not go." He did not want to join Beneh Yisrael because he knew that as a convert, who had joined Beneh Yisrael after having been an idol worshipper, he would be seen as a valuable asset, as someone who could teach and inspire the people in a very unique way. Yitro feared that as a result, "Lo Elech" – he would be unable to "go" further in his own growth and progress. He therefore preferred returning to his homeland, where he was an outcast, and where nobody would expect anything of him, allowing him the freedom to devote himself fully to his personal growth.

Moshe responded that this was not true. First, "Ve’hayita Lanu La’enayim" (literally, "You will be our guide"). Yitro’s presence would be valuable simply "La’enayim" – because the people’s eyes would view him and learn from his inspiring example. He would not need to take time away from his schedule to impact the nation. And additionally, "that good which G-d will bestow upon us – we will bestow upon you." If Yitro teaches, the "goodness" of the Torah which the people experience through his instruction would be bestowed upon him, as well. As a teacher, he would grow from his students. Moshe therefore begged Yitro to join the people and serve both as an inspiring model and an influential teacher – assuring him that his own personal growth would not suffer as a result.

We do not lose when we try to teach and influence the people around us. In theory, we must be prepared to compromise our own growth for this goal, but in practice, this compromise is not necessary, because we only gain by the experience of sharing our knowledge with others.

 

 

Halachot this week are selected and Translated by Hazzan David Azerad

 

Personal Requests in the Amida - Peninei Halacha

 

The Men of the Great Assembly, in their wisdom and divine inspiration, incorporated all the ideal aspirations of the Jewish people in their formulation of the Amida. They meticulously chose every word until arriving at the perfect wording, with which the Jewish soul can pour itself out before the Creator in the most exalted manner possible.

 

Even so, if one wishes to add personal requests in the middle berakhot, one may. However, in the first three berakhot, which are intended to praise God, and in the last three, which are intended for thanksgiving, one may not add personal requests, so as not to detract from their general purpose .

 

The personal requests permitted in the middle berakhot must be related to the theme of the berakha. For example, one may pray for the sick in Refa’enu, for livelihood in Birkat Ha-shanim, or for relatives to make aliya in the Kibbutz Galuyot. In this respect, Shomei’a Tefila is unique in that one may make all types of requests in it. Since it is the culmination of the petitionary berakhot, it encompasses them all. When one adds personal requests, one begins by reciting the fixed formulation and adds their request just before the last line of the berakha.

 

Personal requests are not only permissible but even encouraged, according to many, since the personal prayers come from the depths of the heart and inspire kavana. Nevertheless, it is preferable that one not prolong their personal prayers excessively, not even in Shome’a Tefila, because the Amida is primarily focused on collective needs, and when one adds numerous personal requests, it negates the universal character of the Amida. It is better that one who wishes to add more personal prayers does so after finishing all the berakhot and saying (the first instance of) “Yihyu le-ratzon…” since everything recited after that is not fully part of the Amida. Nevertheless, since one has not yet taken three steps backwards, one is still standing before the Almighty in prayer, and one's personal requests are joined together with the main part of the Amida.

 

One must express their requests in the Amida properly. Therefore, when praying for the sick, the patient’s name should be mentioned. Le-khatĥila, it is good to mention the patient’s name along with his mother or father’s name. However, in the presence of the patient, it is unnecessary to mention their name, since the intention is clear.

 

Bevirkat Shabbat Shalom Umevorach

David Azerad
 

 

 3) HOLY JoKeS!!

 

Selection of funny snippets, loosely related to this weeks parashah or current events, to brighten your day 

 

 

 

4) FOR KIDS

Click on the image to open the youtube video

 

 

LIFECYCLE EVENTS

Celebrate a lifecycle event with us by sponsoring a Kiddouch

 

CONGREGATION MAGHEN ABRAHAM

 

Contact Us

Maghen Abraham
POB 111, Succ Snowdon, Montreal,

H3X 3T3

 

Synagogue:
4894 St-Kévin 
Montréal, Québec, Canada 
macommunaute@maghenabraham.com

 
Thu, July 18 2024 12 Tammuz 5784